Monthly Archives: December 2014

The Cretaceous Tortoise and Hare

Himmapaan

[Cross-posted at Love in the Time of Chasmosaurs.]

Once upon a time, in the autumn of 2011, I submitted an artwork requested by one Scott Persons of the University of Alberta via Art Evolved

Three years later, the resulting set of three illustrations — a race between an Olorotitan and a Tarbosaurus — was finally published in the press release for a study of hadrosaur locomotion by Dr. Phil Currie and Scott Persons, which a few readers may already be familiar with, either independently or via the Chasmosaurs Facebook page. There is also a podcast about the research. Here, for your delectation and privilege (or indeed indifference and ennui, so please you) are the illustrations at a much larger size, which can be opened out in a new tab/window for full-view if you wish. Much of the comic expression in the dinosaurs’ eyes are missed in reduction…

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What Would Jesus Pin?

Godinterest Blog

The phrase “What would Jesus do?” (often abbreviated to WWJD) became popular in the United States in the 1990s and as a personal motto for adherents of Evangelical Christianity who used the phrase as a reminder of their belief in a moral imperative to act in a manner that would demonstrate the love of Jesus through the actions of the adherents. This saying has become a guiding principle for many Christians.

As simple as it seems, the question—What would Jesus Do?—still leaves us wondering.

However, we’re flipping that around and asking you the question, WWJP—Would #Jesus Pin? or Post? Do You Really Want to Know?

First Peter 2:21 says that Jesus left us “an example, that we should follow in his steps.” So, it’s admirable and biblical to ask “WWJP —What would Jesus Pin?” 

what would jesus pinEveryone who knows anything about the gospels—and even those who don’t—knows at a basic level that Jesus was…

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The Enemy: A Picturebook About Humanity, War and Peace

The Book Wars

TheEnemyCover

The Enemy by Swedish author Davide Cali and published in Australia by @wilkinsfarago is a unique picturebook that I stumbled across while processing the special orders @KKBOttawa this past week. When I unpacked The Enemy from the box I was at first completely mesmerized. What was this strange book? Who is the intended audience? What’s the message?

The Enemy primarily follows one soldier, sitting in his hole in the ground waiting for the enemy, who sits across a field in a hole of his own, to make a move. It is clear almost immediately that the our character’s point of view is mirrored by the other soldier – both hide, both are lonesome worrying about their food and water and grasping at memories of loved ones and, most importantly, their training and their manuals.

TheEnemy_Death

The illustrations are tantalizingly simple with childlike images that feature textured illustrations, which layer sketches and…

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08/12/2014 · 7:06 AM

The Story of “Stuff” & Surviving the holidays without consumerism

~ L to the Aura ~

This is the season when consumption skyrockets. The average American spends over $800 on seasonal gifts, even though a national survey (by Center for a new American Dream) indicates that over 70% of Americans would welcome less emphasis on gift giving and spending.

Need proof that people don’t need more “stuff”? The Environmental Protection Agency, estimates that from Thanksgiving to New Year’s household waste increases by more than 25%. That’s an additional million tons of unneeded gifts, packaging and shopping bags – a week! 

It’s very fitting, then, that I share one of my favorite visually appealing explanations of the issues surrounding consumerism – The Story of Stuff – which has now rightly turned into a movement. Check out the video above, and consider re-evaluating how and what you give this season.  Better yet, consider being more intentional with the way you interact with “stuff” all the time.

Convinced, but unsure how to get through the…

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15 Mid-Century Modern Dream Homes that will Kill Your Children

projectophile

The clean lines, the geometric decorative elements, the seamless blending of indoor and outdoor space… I sure do love mid-century modern architecture.

Do you know what I love more? My children. And that is why I will never live in my MCM dream home. Because mid-century modern architecture is designed to KILL YOUR CHILDREN. (Also, moderately clumsy or drunk adults).

im_certain_none_of_these_children_reached_adulthood We can be reasonably certain that none of these children reached adulthood.

As a public service, Projectophile is alerting its readers to the dangers posed by key elements of mid-century modern residential design.

1.  OPEN LEDGES:

I love open, flowing space as much as the next modern girl. But I know it would only be a matter of minutes before my kid flings himself off one of these deadly ledges…

ledge5redarrow Red arrows show the direction of travel of children’s bodies

ledge2 What four-year-old can resist that hidden nook?

ledge4-read arrow That’s going to…

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Cover Wars: Alice in Wonderland

The Book Wars

coverwars3

Join us in judging books by their covers! This week’s cover wars will follow the same format as last week’s: instead of many books, we’ll look at many covers of the same books and assess them based on how well or poorly they represent the story, and which aspect of the characters or plot are emphasized. Happy reading!

Alice 1

Steph: I kinda like it. I’m not sure about all the blank space, I mean, it’s a very plain cover for such a riotous book full of action and colour and mischief. I like the illustration of the rabbit, and I suppose the “white rabbit” could account for the blankness of the cover… and now I’m think Tabula Rasa and wondering if there is a connection to the White Rabbit there, but I think that’s for an essay and not for a cover judgement. I kind of wish that Wonderland were highlighted…

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Hawaii-Style Garlic Shrimp

The Domestic Man

Having spent most of my 20s in Hawaii, we regularly made trips to Giovanni’s shrimp truck in Kahuku to enjoy their signature dish: garlic shrimp. The shrimp is pan-fried in an aromatic scampi sauce, and served with a cubic ton of garlic. I have regularly tackled this dish since moving to the mainland in 2008, but it wasn’t until this past year that I really figured out how to recreate the dish at home.

My process includes marinating and par-cooking the shrimp in butter, then reducing the marinating liquid and garlic until it’s crispy, and finally returning the shrimp to the pan to finish everything off. I have made a couple adjustments over the years that ended up making a big difference in the final product. In order to prevent the butter from burning, I used clarified butter (or ghee) which has a higher smoke point than butter (previously I…

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Stew for You (or Two)

The Domestic Man

Recently, I’ve been thinking about living a simpler life. The idea started when I visited Mickey Trescott’s new home in the Willamette Valley over the summer, but it really solidified when we moved all of our things from Maryland to Florida last month – over 14,000 lbs worth of belongings. As we started unpacking boxes, I couldn’t help but think that I just didn’t need so much stuff. The worst part about it? We’re still unpacking.

So for the holidays this year, we’re trying to not buy any objects for each other. Instead, we’re gifting experiences. So this week’s recipe is going to be a little different from your usual Tuesday post; I’m going to walk you through how to make gifts to hand out to people that aren’t stuff. A couple years back I made a few gallons of my barbecue sauce and gave it away as…

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A Korean Flashback #1: Where the Kitties Get No Pity

The Goat that Wrote

Lately a few fellow early birds I run into as I make my rounds between seaside sunrise and coffee shop have asked how the morning’s snapping went and then hit me with “So, what do you with the pictures?” And I always mumble something about the blog, and personal satisfaction, and more tangible options along the line when I have some money — but mostly what I do with them is edit. Delete and edit. Pretty sad, I know. But they give me a reason to walk, I guess…

A plus side of all this downtime is the progress I’ve made with a ton of shots from my two years in Korea, which was when and where I really buckled down and tried to improve as a photographer, largely as an attempt at therapy, self-medication and diversion. And it would be a shame if I didn’t share some of them, so I’m going to…

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inequality in the skies

orgtheory.net

I’m on a plane right now, flying from Sacramento back to Albany. And sitting here I’m reminded of how air travel itself reflects the growing inequality of society in a trivial, but suggestive, way.

Planes have always had first-class and passenger cabins, at least as far as I know. If the Titanic had this distinction, I’m guessing it was in place from the beginning of commercial aviation.

But for most of my adult life, planes—at least the ones I usually fly on, from one U.S. city to another—looked something like this:

plane 1

Just roughing it out here, this means that 7% of the passengers used about 15% of the room, with the other 93% using 85% of the cabin space. Such a plane would have a Gini index of about 8. (For reference, the U.S. Gini is about 48, and the global one is around 65.)

Domestic airlines have pretty much…

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